Cumberland Lodge Report published today, on Race in Britain, with cross-sector recommendations for driving effective change

Published Date: 
Friday, 25 October 2019

 

Race in Britain: Inequality, Identity & Belonging was launched on 24 October 2019 at Mary Sumner House, Westminster, with guest panellists Dr Zubaida Haque (Deputy Director, The Runnymede Trust), Sunder Katwala (Director, British Future) and the report's author, Dr Farhan Samanani, a researcher currently based at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religion and Ethnic Diversity in Göttingen, Germany.

Read on screen

The report focuses on issues of inequality, identity and belonging. It offers a unique, cross-sector insight, drawing on the combined experience of academics from a wide range of disciplines, policymakers, charities, business leaders, community practitioners and activists, and young people, from across the UK.

In Part II, it presents a series of practical, cross-sector recommendations for diagnosing ongoing discrimination and inequalities, and driving effective change in society.

Download

A digital copy of the full report can also be downloaded in pdf format from this webpage.

To request a printed copy, please contact us at programmeteam@cumberlandlodge.ac.uk.

Recommendations

The report’s recommendations, which are each expanded on in full, in the report, are:

Diagnosing discrimination and inequality

  • Pay attention to different causes of discrimination

  • Look at both personal cases and overall trends

  • National audits and public platforms matter

  • Distinguish carefully between legitimate and overly prejudiced concerns around diversity

  • Build relationships, and embrace pluralism

  • Inequality and discrimination are also problems for majorities to act on

Driving effective change

  • Speak to existing values and focus on potential

  • Pay attention to the relationship between discrimination and inequality

  • Support communities, don’t just call on them

  • Make sure your approach is robust and credible

  • Representation matters